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Register your car


Answer

It is your responsibility to inform the DVLA when you sell or purchase a car. Both the buyer and the seller must complete the relevant sections on the V5 – see Q916.

The law provides that where there is a change of registered keeper the existing registered keeper must notify the DVLA – if they fail to do this they could be fined up to £1000. Additionally, they will still receive any documentation from any organisations relating to that vehicle e.g. parking fines.

You can now tell the DVLA you've sold, transferred or bought a vehicle online via the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/sold-bought-vehicle

Note that in order to have done this the seller must register the vehicle to the new keeper online.


Answer

If you used to own the vehicle but don't anymore

 

If you have a letter from the DVLA confirming that you are no longer the registered keeper of the vehicle, send a copy to the organisation that sent you the fine. It's a good idea to keep a copy of any documentation that you send.

 

If you don't have a letter from the DVLA confirming that you are no longer the registered keeper of the vehicle, write to them at the address below and ask for such proof.


DVLA
Swansea
SA99 1ZZ

 

When you have obtained confirmation from the DVLA that you're no longer the registered keeper, you can send it to the organisation that sent you the fine.

Please note that if you have not informed the DVLA that you have sold the car (see Q916) then you will continue to receive any documentation to do with the car until you do notify them that you are no longer the keeper and provide them with details of who you sold it to.

 

The law provides that where there is a change of registered keeper the existing registered keeper must notify the DVLA – if they fail to do this they could be fined up to £1000.

 

You can now tell the DVLA you've sold, transferred or bought a vehicle online via the link below:

 

https://www.gov.uk/sold-bought-vehicle

 

If you have never owned the vehicle


Write to the DVLA at the address above and ask them for proof that you're not the registered keeper of the vehicle – provide them with as much information about the vehicle as you can. The DVLA will then update their records and send you a letter to confirm this within 4 weeks. You can then send it to the organisation that sent you the fine.

If you suspect your vehicle's number plates may have been cloned because you've received a parking ticket/fine but know it wasn't your vehicle

 

Cloning involves the copying of the identity of a similar (non-stolen) vehicle already on the road. Criminals find an exact match of the car they have stolen and copy the identity of the legitimate vehicle. This makes the vehicle they have stolen look legal based on false number plates being fitted. Unfortunately, it is up to you as the registered keeper to satisfy the issuer of the ticket that it was not you or your vehicle at the time and place where the alleged offence occurred.

 

If you suspect your vehicle registration has been cloned, we would suggest you:

  • Report the matter to your local police via the non-emergency 101 number, the contact us page on their website (see link below) or by going to the police station.

Q727

  • Contact the organisation that sent you the ticket/documentation and explain the circumstances to them.
  • Complete any relevant documentation you have been sent and return it to the organisation that issued it, providing them with any evidence that you have to prove your case – see additional suggestions below.
  • Write to the DVLA at the above address and explain the circumstances to them – include the crime reference number if the police gave you one. They will keep a record of the matter for future reference.

Additional suggestions:

  • You could consider taking a photograph of the rear of your vehicle that may show that it was not your car. There will be differences between your car and the cloned one.
  • Legally manufactured number plates must have the details of the manufacturer on them so that may also be a way of distinguishing the vehicles, providing the photograph is of a high enough quality.
  • Can you prove your vehicle wasn't in the location at the time of the offence e.g. if you park your car in a car park whilst at work the operator may have CCTV evidence to prove that your car was there at the time of the alleged offence.


Answer

Yes, it is an offence not to notify the DVLA when you purchase a car. You can do this via the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/sold-bought-vehicle

If you fail to notify the DVLA, you will be liable for a substantial fine if found guilty of the offence.


Answer

The DVLA maintains a register of vehicles and their keepers. This register is kept for a variety of reasons; road safety, revenue collection and law enforcement. It is important, therefore, that the person listed as the registered keeper is the person who is responsible for the day to day running of the car.

The registered keeper should be the person who is using the vehicle and keeping it, which can sometimes be different to the owner of the vehicle or the person who is responsible for paying for it – see Q743 for the difference between the owner and registered keeper of a vehicle.


Answer

A registration document (V5) is not proof of ownership. The registered keeper should be the person who is actually using / keeping the vehicle and this is not necessarily the owner of the vehicle or the person who is paying for it.

That person is the person responsible for the vehicle so far as official communications from the police/DVLA etc., but the owner is the person who put up the cash (or was given it as a gift).

The DVLA make a point of saying that the person named on the registration document is not necessarily the owner.

This is particularly true with a company car which is owned by the company, however the registration document should show the registered keeper, i.e. the day to day user (this may be an employee who has it as a permanent perk with his/her job).

In the case of a car used by a married couple, ownership of any property is usually classed as joint and if the husband/wife was stopped driving the vehicle without insurance the police would probably accept that he/she was the joint owner and not look to the other partner for additional offences, such as owner permitting no insurance.

A registered keeper will usually be regarded as responsible for parking tickets etc. so it would be wise to have the registration document changed if you are the owner, but not the user/keeper. Additionally, as the owner/registered keeper of a vehicle, there might also be some circumstances where you could be prosecuted for an offence, e.g. if you are permitting someone to use the vehicle knowing full well it is not insured or roadworthy.


Answer

From 1st April 2017, the way that vehicle tax is calculated and its cost will change for cars and some motor homes.

Vehicles registered before 1st April 2017
If your vehicle was registered before 1st April 2017, you won't be affected by the new rules – you can use the link below to find the amount of vehicle tax you'll pay:

https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-tax-rate-tables

Vehicles registered from 1st April 2017
The first time you tax your vehicle i.e. for the first year, the amount you pay is based on your vehicle's CO2 emissions – you can check how much you'll have to pay by using the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-tax-rate-tables/vehicles-registered-on-or-after-1-april-2017

The second and subsequent times i.e. after the first year, you tax your vehicle the amount you pay will depend on the type of vehicle you have. You'll pay:

  • £140 a year for normal petrol or diesel vehicles
  • £130 a year for alternative fuel vehicles (hybrids, bi -ethanol and LPG )
  • £0 a year for vehicles with zero CO2 emissions

This means that for new vehicles, you'll pay more vehicle tax in the first year but a lower annual rate (£140 for most cars) thereafter.

New vehicles costing more than £40 000
If you buy a vehicle that has a list price (the published price before any discounts) of more than £40,000, the amount you pay for your vehicle tax the first time will be based on CO2 emissions – see the link below for the cost:

https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-tax-rate-tables/vehicles-registered-on-or-after-1-april-2017

When you tax your vehicle for a second time i.e. after the first year, you'll pay one of the new rates that depend on the type of vehicle (petrol, diesel, alternative fuel or zero emissions), plus an extra £310 per year for the next 5 years. After this you'll be taxed at one of the new rates i.e. £140, £130 or £0, depending on the type of vehicle.

Discounts on vehicle tax for those claiming benefits
If you claim benefits the link below explains about the discounts you may be entitled to and how to apply for them:

https://www.gov.uk/financial-help-disabled/vehicles-and-transport

Contact your local police force

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