ATP Template with bundler

Driving Licence


Answer

DVLA – general information
In line with the government's advice DVLA have a very limited number of staff on-site who are only dealing with applications from those who are directly involved in the response to the Covid-19 pandemic. In particular, they are prioritising applications relating to HGV drivers and key workers to make sure they get any documentation they need as quickly as possible. They are unable to deal with any other paper applications until further notice.

DVLA's customer reception in Swansea is closed. Please do not travel for assistance in person as there will be no one available to help you.

So DVLA can help those in most need, please do not call unless you are directly involved in the nation's response to Covid-19. Unfortunately, they will not be able to respond to any other calls or general queries until further notice.

DVLA's opening hours for key workers only are Monday to Friday, 10am to 4pm – please see the information below for contact details:

Email: https://key-worker.dvla.gov.uk/

Phone:

Vehicles enquiry – 0300 123 1272
Drivers enquiry – 0300 123 2408
Drivers Medical enquiry – 0300 790 6103

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DVLAgovuk

Delays in issuing licences
DVLA are currently facing delays in issuing driving licence renewals for drivers with a medical condition.


This is because, with NHS staff rightly focused on the nationwide response to Coronavirus, if you have a health condition requiring further information or examinations, there are likely to be significant delays before NHS doctors, consultants or opticians are able to provide the DVLA with the information they need to be able to make a licensing decision and send you a new driving licence.


Providing you have a current driving licence and you have not been told by your doctor or optician that you should not drive, you will be able to drive while DVLA is considering your application.


Road safety is DVLA's top priority and by law, all drivers must meet certain minimum medical standards and drivers must ensure they are medically fit to drive. All drivers must notify DVLA of the onset or worsening of a medical condition – please see the link below:


https://www.gov.uk/health-conditions-and-driving

Driving lessons, theory tests and driving tests to restart in England
Driving lessons and theory tests will restart on Saturday 4 July 2020 in England, and car driving tests will restart from Wednesday 22 July 2020.

The rule applies to all types of driver and motorcycle training in England, including private practice with someone you live with or in your support bubble.

Theory tests will take place with social distancing measures in place to help stop the spread of coronavirus.

When services restart depends on what vehicle you're learning to drive or ride – please see the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/driving-lessons-theory-tests-and-driving-tests-to-restart-in-england

The link below provides information on how driving tests will be conducted when they restart:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-driving-tests-and-theory-tests


Apply for an emergency driving/theory test if you're a critical/key worker

You can apply for an emergency test if your work is critical to the coronavirus response. This includes if you work in:

  • health and social care
  • education and childcare
  • key public services
  • local and national government
  • food and other necessary goods
  • public safety and national security
  • transport
  • utilities, communication and financial services

The links below allow you to apply for a driving/theory test if you're a key worker:

https://www.gov.uk/apply-emergency-driving-test

https://www.gov.uk/apply-emergency-theory-test

Bus and lorry drivers – D4 medical updates
The Government is making temporary provisions for bus and lorry drivers aged 45 and over to forego the need for a D4 medical in order to renew their driving entitlement. These changes are temporary and will only apply where the licence has not expired before 1 January 2020.

The licence will only be valid for one year instead of five years and the driver will need to submit a completed D4 when the licence is due for renewal in 12 months. Drivers with health issues will still need to declare these, and those with health issues that prevent them from driving safely will not have their licence renewed. All drivers must ensure they are medically fit to drive.

The above has been taken from information written and supplied by the DVLA, DfT and .GOV


Answer

You will need to contact the training school where you took your CBT course via the link below – they can charge up to £20 for the replacement copy.

https://www.gov.uk/find-motorcycle-training

If your certificate has been stolen, report it to your local police via the link below:

https://www.askthe.police.uk/content/Q727.htm

If the training school has closed, you will need to contact the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) via the information below (telephone lines are presently unavailable due to COVID-19):

DVSA CBT team on cbt@dvsa .gov.uk

You will need the following:

  • the name and address of the training school where you took the course
  • the date of the course
  • a valid credit/debit card to pay the £20 fee


Answer

From the 28th September 2020, the way the theory test works in England, Scotland and Wales will change.

 

The change is intended to make the test more accessible but especially to those with reading/learning difficulties or conditions such as autism.

 

To begin with, the change will only apply to car driving tests.

 

Presently, you have to read a case study and then answer 5 questions about it, but if you take the test from 28th September, you'll watch a video clip instead of reading the case study and then answer 3 questions about it.

The video will be quite short, silent and you can view it as many times as you wish – you'll then need to correctly answer 3 multi-choice questions about it. You'll have to choose the correct answer to each question from 4 possible answers.

You can watch an example the type of video clip you'll be shown in the link below:

 

https://youtu .be/FnMMjuaS8fQ

 

You'll be asked question such as:

  1. Why are motorcyclists considered vulnerable road users?
  2. Why should the driver, on the side road, look out for motorcyclists at junctions?
  3. In this clip, who can cross the chevrons to overtake other vehicles, when it's safe to do so?

 

The screen you'll see will look like the one shown below:

 

 

If the image does not display, please click here.

 

(Image courtesy of the DfT)


Answer

An LGV is a vehicle that weighs over 3,500 kg.

Drivers will need a different licence entitlement to drive different types of buses, coaches and lorries. Drivers must hold full (not provisional) category B entitlement (car) before they can take an LGV or PCV test . They must also gain a full category entitlement for a vehicle before taking a second test to add the trailer entitlement (+E). No additional entitlement is required to tow trailers that weigh less than 750 kg. If at any stage the driver loses their car licence entitlement, they will also automatically lose the LGV or PCV licence.

Every person intending to use a goods vehicle (above 3.5 tonnes) in connection with any trade or business carried out by him, or a Passenger Carrying Vehicle on a road, for hire or reward, must apply to the Traffic Commissioner for an operator licence. The role of Traffic Commissioners is to promote road safety and the safety of the travelling public.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA), on behalf of the Traffic Commissioners, maintain the Operator Licensing scheme. DVSA process all Operator Licence applications. The DVSA website includes comprehensive guidance on how to apply and manage licence details, which can now be changed electronically.

Further information can be obtained from either the DVLA or the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DSVA).


Answer

You should attend at your chosen police station with the ticket and the rest of your documents (insurance and MOT) in order to comply with the ticket. The person who takes the details will note that you have not produced your licence and you are likely to be reported. The speeding ticket and the failure to produce your licence will both be dealt with at court and a summons will be issued to you in due course. You do not always have to attend court and may be able to plead guilty by letter. The summons you receive will tell you whether this is possible.

It is advisable if you have not already done so to apply for a new licence as soon as possible (see Related Information). If the licence comes shortly afterwards it may be worth contacting the central ticket office of your local police force to see if they will allow you to pay the speeding fine without the possibility of attending court. This is discretionary as after 28 days a summons will be issued.


Answer

The usual length of time to return a licence is four weeks. If you have still not received your licence back after this length of time you should contact the Central Ticket/Fixed Penalty Office of the police force involved, they should be able to assist you.


Answer

You should inform your insurance company of any penalty points you have received. The details you provide to them form the basis for your insurance quote and subsequent insurance cover. If any of the details change or are incorrect and you do not inform your insurer, it may affect your cover.


Answer

To hold a licence to drive a moped you have to be 16 years old. To hold a licence for a car you have to be 17 years old, unless you are getting or have applied for the enhanced rate of the mobility component of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) in which case the minimum age is 16. To ride a motorcycle you have to be 17 years old.


Answer

Please see details of how long penalty points / endorsements may stay on your licence below.

4 years from the date of offence for endorsement codes

Code

Offence

Points

AC10

Failing to stop after an accident

5 to 10

AC20

Failing to give particulars or report an accident within 24 hours

5 to 10

AC30

Undefined accident offences

4 to 9

BA10

Driving while disqualified by order of court

6

BA30

Attempting to drive while disqualified by order of court

6

CD10

Driving without due care and attention

3 to 9

CD20

Driving without reasonable consideration for other road users

3 to 9

CD30

Driving without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other road users

3 to 9

CU10

Using a vehicle with defective brakes

3

CU20

Causing or likely to cause danger by reason of use of unsuitable vehicle or using a vehicle with parts or accessories (excluding brakes, steering or tyres) in a dangerous condition

3

CU30

Using a vehicle with defective tyres

3

CU40

Using a vehicle with defective steering

3

CU50

Causing or likely to cause danger by reason of load or passengers

3

CU80

Breach of requirements as to control of the vehicle, such as using a mobile phone

3 to 6

DR40

In charge of a vehicle while alcohol level above limit (If a disqualification isn't imposed)

10

DR50

In charge of a vehicle while unfit through drink (If a disqualification isn't imposed)

10

DR60

Failure to provide a specimen for analysis in circumstances other than driving or attempting to drive (If a disqualification isn't imposed)

10

DR70

Failing to provide specimen for breath test (If a disqualification isn't imposed)

4

DG40

In charge of a vehicle while drug level above specified limit (If a disqualification isn't imposed)

10

DR90

In charge of a vehicle when unfit through drugs (If a disqualification isn't imposed)

10

IN10

Using a vehicle uninsured against third party risks

6 to 8

LC20

Driving otherwise than in accordance with a licence

3 to 6

LC30

Driving after making a false declaration about fitness when applying for a licence

3 to 6

LC40

Driving a vehicle having failed to notify a disability

3 to 6

LC50

Driving after a licence has been cancelled (revoked) or refused on medical grounds

3 to 6

MS10

Leaving a vehicle in a dangerous position

3

MS20

Unlawful pillion riding

3

MS30

Play street offences

2

MS50

Motor racing on the highway

3 to 11

MS60

Offences not covered by other codes (including offences relating to breach of requirements as to control of vehicle)

3

MS70

Driving with uncorrected defective eyesight

3

MS80

Refusing to submit to an eyesight test

3

MS90

Failure to give information as to identity of driver etc.

6

MW10

Contravention of special roads regulations (excluding speed limits) (Motorway offences)

3

PC10

Undefined contravention of pedestrian crossing regulations

3

PC20

Contravention of pedestrian crossing regulations with moving vehicle

3

PC30

Contravention of pedestrian crossing regulations with stationary vehicle

3

SP10

Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits

3 to 6

SP20

Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles)

3 to 6

SP30

Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road

3 to 6

SP40

Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit

3 to 6

SP50

Exceeding speed limit on a motorway

3 to 6

TS10

Failing to comply with traffic light signals

3

TS20

Failing to comply with double white lines

3

TS30

Failing to comply with 'stop' sign

3

TS40

Failing to comply with direction of a constable/warden

3

TS50

Failing to comply with traffic sign (excluding 'stop' signs, traffic lights or double white lines)

3

TS60

Failing to comply with a school crossing patrol sign

3

TS70

Undefined failure to comply with a traffic direction sign

3

UT50

Aggravated taking of a vehicle

3 to 11

 

 

 

4 years from the date of conviction for endorsement codes

Code

Offence

Points

BA40

Causing death by driving while disqualified

3 to 11

BA60

Causing serious injury by driving while disqualified

3 to 11

CD80

Causing death by careless, or inconsiderate driving

3 to 11

CD90

Causing death by driving: unlicensed, disqualified or uninsured drivers

3 to 11

DD10

Causing serious injury by dangerous driving

3 to 11

DD40

Dangerous driving

3 to 11

DD60

Manslaughter or culpable homicide while driving a vehicle

3 to 11

DD80

Causing death by dangerous driving

3 to 11

DD90

Furious driving

3 to 9

DR40

In charge of a vehicle while alcohol level above limit (If a disqualification is imposed)

10

DR50

In charge of a vehicle while unfit through drink (If a disqualification is imposed)

10

DR60

Failure to provide a specimen for analysis in circumstances other than driving or attempting to drive (If a disqualification is imposed)

10

DR70

Failing to provide specimen for breath test (If a disqualification is imposed)

4

DG40

In charge of a vehicle while drug level above specified limit (If a disqualification is imposed)

10

DR90

In charge of a vehicle when unfit through drugs (If a disqualification is imposed)

10

TT99

Disqualification under 'totting-up' - if the total of penalty points reaches 12 or more within 3 years, the driver can be disqualified.

NA

 

 

 

11 years from the date of conviction for endorsement codes

Code

Offence

Points

CD40

Causing death through careless driving when unfit through drink

3 to 11

CD50

Causing death through careless driving when unfit through drugs

3 to 11

CD60

Causing death through careless driving with alcohol level above the limit

3 to 11

CD70

Causing death by careless driving then failing to supply a specimen for alcohol analysis

3 to 11

DR10

Driving or attempting to drive with alcohol level above the prescribed limit

3 to 11

DR20

Driving or attempting to drive while unfit through drink

3 to 11

DR30

Driving or attempting to drive then failing to supply a specimen for analysis

3 to 11

DR31

Driving or attempting to drive then refusing to give permission for analysis of a blood sample that was taken without consent due to incapacity

3 to 11

DR61

Refusing to give permission for analysis of a blood sample that was taken without consent due to incapacity in circumstances other than driving or attempting to drive.

10

DG10

Driving or attempting to drive with drug level above the specified limit

3 to 11

DG60

Causing death by careless driving with drug level above the limit

3 to 11

DG80

Driving or attempting to drive when unfit through drugs

3 to 11

 


Answer

You will need to apply for a new licence. If you had a paper licence you will need to apply for a photocard licence. You can apply for a new licence online via the link below:

Replace a lost, stolen, damaged or destroyed driving licence

During the Covid-19 pandemic, the DVLA are operating with reduced staff and reduced opening hours, and should only be contacted in relation to urgent issues. Please see Q1021 for further details regarding contacting the DVLA.


Answer

Coming to live in Great Britain
If you have a valid EU/EEA licence, you can drive any vehicle covered by the categories shown on your licence for the periods set out below.

Ordinary licences:
Until you are 70 or have lived in GB for three years, whichever is longer.

The phrase 'Until you are 70 or have lived in GB for three years, whichever is longer', means that you can drive in the UK any vehicle covered by the categories shown on your valid EU/EEA licence until you are 70. The three-year element relates to someone who came to live in the UK at say the age of 68, they could drive until they were 71 on their EU licence because it is the longer of the two periods i.e. 70 or for three years, whichever is longer.

Please note that someone can drive in Great Britain for only 12 months if they got their EU licence by exchanging a non-EU licence.


Vocational licences:

  • If you are younger than 45, until you are 45 or have lived in Great Britain for five years, whichever is longer.
  • If you are over 45 but under 65, until you are 66 or have lived in Great Britain for five years, whichever is sooner.
  • If you are aged 65 or over, until you have lived in Great Britain for 12 months.

You must get a British driving licence to continue driving in Great Britain after these periods.

Visiting Great Britain
If you have a valid EU/EEA licence and you are visiting Great Britain, you can drive any vehicle covered by the categories shown on your licence.

Please note that someone can drive in Great Britain for only 12 months if they got their EU licence by exchanging a non-EU licence.

Register of European Union licence holders

Ordinary licences:
If you have an EU/EEA ordinary licence, you do not have to register, but you can if you want to.

Vocational licences:
By law, if you come to live in Great Britain and hold an EU/EEA vocational licence you must register your details with the DVLA within 12 months of moving here. To register you will need to fill in, 'Application to register a non GB driving licence' (D9). You can:

Further information
The following questions may also be of use:


Answer

Visiting Great Britain
Ordinary licences:
While your full licence or driving permit is valid, you can drive vehicles weighing up to 3.5 tonnes, and with up to eight passenger seats, for up to 12 months from the date you came to Great Britain.

Vocational licences:
If you hold a vocational licence, you can only drive large vehicles which have been registered outside Great Britain and which you have driven into Great Britain.

Coming to live in Great Britain
Ordinary licences:
While your full licence is valid, you can drive any type of small vehicle shown on your licence for up to 12 months from the time you started living in Great Britain. To continue to drive after this you must pass a GB driving test before the 12 month period ends. If you get a GB provisional licence during this period, you will not have to display 'L' plates or be supervised by a qualified driver, and you will be able to drive on motorways. If you do not pass a test within the 12 month period, you will not be allowed to drive as a full licence holder and the conditions of a GB provisional licence will apply. If you do not apply for a provisional licence within 12 months, you must stop driving and get a GB provisional licence – the conditions of a GB provisional licence will then apply – see Q357. You can apply for a provisional licence online via the link below:

Apply for your first provisional driving licence

Vocational licences:
You cannot drive large vehicles until you have passed the relevant GB driving test. You must pass a car driving test before applying for provisional entitlement to drive larger vehicles as a learner.

If you continue to drive after the periods stated above you will be committing an offence and your vehicle could be seized.

Exchange driving licences:

If you hold a driving licence/permit from a designated country (please see the list below) or Gibraltar, you can exchange it for a full equivalent UK driving licence in certain categories within 5 years of becoming a resident in the UK.

Please note that your original driving licence is only valid in the UK for the first 12 months. To continue driving you must exchange your licence for a GB one before the end of the 12 months. If you do not do this, you must stop driving.

List of designated countries

Andorra, Australia, Barbados, British Virgin Islands, Canada, Faroe Islands, Falkland Islands, Hong Kong, Japan, Republic of Korea, Monaco, New Zealand, Singapore, South Africa, Switzerland, Zimbabwe .

You can find out if you can exchange your driving licence via the link below:

Exchange a foreign driving licence

Further information
The following questions may also be of use:

If you continue to drive after the periods stated above you will be committing an offence and your vehicle could be seized.


Answer

There will be information on the ticket as to what you need to do but the basic system in the UK is explained below.

The key point is whether you have a satisfactory UK address – this is defined as one in the UK at which, in the opinion of the constable, it is likely that it would be possible to find you whenever necessary in connection with court proceedings or the issue of a fixed penalty notice.

If you have such an address, the police officer will issue you with a notice in relation to your speeding offence. Then, depending on the circumstances, you may be invited to attend a Speed Awareness Course, be given a fixed penalty fine and points or have to attend court. Note that you will be notified of what action the police intend to take in due course, you cannot request a Speed Awareness Course, it up to the police to decide whether the circumstances in which you exceeded the speed limit are suitable for such a course.

If you do attend a Speed Awareness Course you will not receive any penalty points or a fine but you will have to pay for the cost of the course – foreign licence holders can take a Speed Awareness Course in the UK. Alternatively, if you are given penalty points, the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) in the UK will create a record for you and the points will be shown on that record.

If you cannot provide the police officer with a satisfactory UK address they will require a roadside deposit from you – for speeding this will be £100. However, if the offence is to be prosecuted at court the deposit will be £300. If you can't pay the deposit immediately, your vehicle may be prohibited and immobilised.

Further information
The following questions may also be of use:


Answer

If you get six or more points on your licence within two years of passing your driving test your licence will be revoked.

Any penalty points you get on your provisional licence that haven't expired will be carried over to your full licence when you pass your test – points usually last for 3 years. However, your licence will be revoked if you get any further penalty points that take you up to a total of 6 or more within 2 years of passing your driving test.

If your licence is revoked, in order to be able to drive again, you'll have to apply and pay for a new provisional licence and pass both theory and practical parts of the driving test again to get your full licence back.

The 2 year probationary period only applies to the very first test you take, this will usually be for a car or motorcycle, it doesn't apply to any further tests.


Answer

If you are banned from driving you don't have to automatically you have to re-take your test. At the time you were disqualified the court will tell you the exact terms of your disqualification. Although the courts do have the power to require you to take a driving test prior to obtaining your full licence, it depends on the offence committed.


Answer

If your driving licence has been taken away because you've been disqualified you must apply for a new licence before you can start driving again. The way in which you apply will depend on whether you're a high risk offender. You're a high risk offender if you:

  • were convicted of 2 drink driving offences within 10 years
  • were driving with an alcohol reading of at least 87.5 microgrammes of alcohol per 100 millilitres of breath, 200 milligrammes of alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood, or 
267.5 milligrammes of alcohol per 100 millilitres of urine
  • refused to give the police a sample of breath, blood or urine to test for alcohol
  • refused to allow a sample of your blood to be tested for alcohol (eg if it was taken when you were unconscious)

Medical examination with a DVLA doctor
You'll be sent an application form by the DVLA 90 days before your disqualification ends. During this period you must have a medical examination that will be conducted by one of the DVLA's appointed doctors - you will need to pay for this. This in intended to establish whether you're fit to drive and will include:

  • a questionnaire about your medical history and use of alcohol
  • a physical examination
  • blood tests

Non-high risk offenders
DVLA will send you form D27, 56 days before your disqualification ends. You must complete this form and return it to the DVLA . You may have to include a new passport type photograph with your application. If you don't receive your renewal form you can order one from the DVLA's online ordering service Download and order DVLA forms

Bus, coach or lorry licence
You will need to complete form D2. You can order a D2 form from DVLA Download and order DVLA forms

Northern Ireland
You will need to contact the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA ).

Non-GB licence holders
DVLA will return your licence when your disqualification period ends.

Short Period Disqualification (SPD)
A disqualification of less than 56 days is known as a Short Period Disqualification (SPD). You won't need to renew your licence.


Answer

No, the paper counterpart to photocard driving licences is no longer valid and is no longer issued by the DVLA (Note: this does not affect photocard licences issued by the DVLA in Northern Ireland). So, if you have a photocard licence, you only need to surrender the photocard part - see the question on paper counterpart licences for further information.


Answer

You still need to attend at the chosen police station to show your driving documents. You should explain the circumstances and see if they are willing to grant an extension. Extensions are discretionary and it will be up to each Force as to whether they are granted or not.


Answer

You can start driving as soon as you pass your driving test but you must have an insurance policy that allows you to drive without supervision. If you are in any doubt about this contact your insurer and clarify the matter with them before you drive. Nonetheless, it's not a good idea to drive straight away after your test, as you'll probably be very excited and this could affect your judgement.

Providing you have a photocard provisional licence that shows your correct name, your driving test examiner will send your test pass certificate to the DVLA, you should then receive your full licence within 3 weeks.

If the name on your provisional licence is not correct or if you have a paper provisional licence, you will need to:

  • Complete the declaration on your test pass certificate.
  • Get a driving licence application form (D1) from the Post Office and complete it.
  • Provide documents that confirm your identity.
  • If you have a paper provisional licence, include a passport photo.

Send your provisional licence and the above documents to the following address:

DVLA
Swansea
SA99 1BN

Note that:

  • Your test pass certificate is only valid for 2 years after passing your driving test. If you don't send it to the DVLA and obtain you full licence within this time, you'll have to retake your driving test.
  • Whilst you can drive on your own you cannot supervise a learner driver, see question on requirements for supervising a learner driver for further information.


Answer

Driving licence categories on or after 19th January 2013

 

Category

Description

Minimum age

Notes

AM

Moped – two-wheel vehicles or three-wheel vehicles with a maximum design speed of over 25km/h and not more than 45km/h.

 

 

Light quadricycle – with an unladen mass of not more than 350kg, not including the mass of the batteries in the case of electric vehicles, whose maximum design speed is over 25km/h and not more than 45km/h.

16

 

A1

Motorcycles

  • A motorcycle with a cylinder capacity not exceeding 125cc, of a power not exceeding 11kW and with a power to weight ratio not exceeding 0.1kW per kg.
  • A motor tricycle with a power not exceeding 15kW.

17

 

A2

Motorcycles – motorcycle of a power not exceeding 35kW, with a power to weight ratio not exceeding 0.2kW per kg and not derived from a vehicle of more than double its power.

19

10

A

Motorcycles

  • A motorcycle of a power exceeding 35kW or with a power to weight ratio exceeding 0.2kW per kg, or
  • A motorcycle of a power not exceeding 35kW with a power to weight ratio not exceeding 0.2kW per kg and derived from a vehicle of more than double its power.
  • A motor tricycle with a power exceeding 15kW.

24

1, 10, 11

B1

Four wheeled light vehicles – motor vehicles with four wheels up to 400kg unladen weight or 550kg for vehicles intended for carrying goods.

17

 

B

Cars

  • Motor vehicles with a MAM not exceeding 3,500kg, designed and constructed for the carriage of no more than eight passengers in addition to the driver with a trailer up to 750kg.
  • As category B but with a trailer weighing more than 750kg. The total weight of the vehicle and trailer can't weigh more than 3500kg.

17

2, 11, 12

BE

Cars with trailers – combinations of vehicles consisting of a vehicle in category B and a trailer, where the combination does not come within category B, and the MAM of the trailer or semi-trailer does not exceed 3,500kg.

17

 

C1

Medium sized vehicles – vehicles between 3500kg and 7500kg, designed and constructed for the carriage of no more than eight passengers in addition to the driver with a trailer up to 750kg.

18

5, 10

C1E

Medium sized vehicles and trailers – vehicles between 3500kg and 7500kg with a trailer over 750kg, designed and constructed for the carriage of no more than eight passengers in addition to the driver – combined weight not more than 12000kg.

18

3, 5, 10

C

Large goods vehicles vehicles over 3500kg with a trailer up to 750kg, designed and constructed for the carriage of no more than eight passengers in addition to the driver.

21

3, 10

CE

Large goods vehicles with trailers – vehicles over 3500kg designed and constructed for the carriage of no more than eight passengers in addition to the driver with a trailer over 750kg.

21

3, 10

D1

Minibuses – vehicles with no more than 16 passenger seats in addition to the driver and with a maximum length not exceeding eight metres with a trailer up to 750kg.

21

4, 5

D1E

Minibuses with trailers – vehicles with no more than 16 passenger seats in addition to the driver and with a maximum length not exceeding eight metres with a trailer over 750kg, provided that the MAM of the combination formed does not exceed 12000kg.

21

4, 5

D

Buses – any bus designed and constructed for the carriage of more than eight passengers in addition to the driver, with a trailer up to 750kg.

24

4

DE

Buses with trailers – any bus designed and constructed for the carriage of more than eight passengers in addition to the driver, with a trailer over 750kg.

24

4

p

Moped – a motor vehicle with fewer than four wheels with a maximum design speed exceeding 45km/h but not exceeding 50km/h and which, if propelled by an internal combustion engine, has a cylinder capacity not exceeding 50cc.

16

6

q

Moped – a motor vehicle with fewer than four wheels which, if propelled by an internal combustion engine, has a cylinder capacity not exceeding 50cc and, if not equipped with pedals by means of which the vehicle is capable of being propelled, has a maximum design speed not exceeding 25km/h.

16

6

f

Agricultural tractors

17

7

g

Roadrollers

21

8, 10

h

Tracked vehicles

21

9, 10

k

Mowing machines or vehicles controlled by someone on foot

16

 

 

Note 1
Age 24 or 2 years from date of Standard A2 test pass. Tricycle restriction code 79 (tri)/79(03) – this means restricted to tricycles.

Note 2
Age 16 if you are getting or have applied for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) (mobility component) at the enhanced rate.

Note 3
You can drive at age 17 if you are a member of the armed forces. You can drive at 18 if one of the following apply:

  • you passed your driving test and Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (Driver CPC ) initial qualification
  • you are learning to drive or taking a driving test for this category or Driver CPC initial qualification
  • you are taking a national vocational training course to get a Driver CPC initial qualification
  • you had your driving licence before 10 September 2009, you must take the Driver CPC periodic training within 5 years of this date.

Note 4
You can drive at age 17 if you are a member of the armed forces.

You can drive these vehicles at age 18 if one of the following apply:
(i) If you are learning to either:

  • take your Passenger Carrying Vehicle (PCV) driving test, or
  • get your Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC )

(ii) If you have passed a PCV driving test and Driver CPC initial qualification, you can drive if:

  • carrying passengers on a regular service where the route doesn't exceed 31 miles, or
  • not engaged in the carriage of passengers, or
  • driving a vehicle of a class included in sub-category D1
  • you don't drive a bus or minibus abroad.

(iii) Since 10 September 2008, drivers passing a PCV test and driving under a bus operator's licence, or minibus permit, or community bus permit, you can drive if:

  • carrying passengers on a regular service where the route doesn't exceed 31 miles, or
  • not engaged in the carriage of passengers, or
  • driving a vehicle of a class included in sub-category D1
  • you don't drive a bus or minibus abroad.

You can drive at age 20 after passing a PCV driving test and Driver CPC initial qualification.

 

For further advice you can contact the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency by phoning 0300 200 1122.

Age 21 for categories D and DE if:

  • the vehicle is being used by the fire service or for maintaining public order
  • undergoing road tests for repair or maintenance purposes, or
  • if you were entitled to drive the vehicle before 19 January 2013.

Note 5

If you passed your test for category B or B automatic before 1 January 1997 your licence will already show entitlement to C1, C1E (8.25 tonnes), D1 and D1E (not for hire or reward).

Note 6

National category only.

Note 7

At 16 you can drive tractors less than 2.45m wide. It must only pull trailers less than 2.45m wide with two wheels, or four wheels that are close-coupled.
Note 8
At 17 you can drive small roadrollers with metal or hard rollers. They must not be steam powered, weigh more than 11.69 tonnes or be made for carrying loads.

Note 9
You can drive at 17 if the MAM of the tracked vehicle is not more than 3,500kg.

Note 10
You can ride or drive at age 17 if you are a member of the armed forces.

Note 11
An exemption exists for the holder of category B, to drive large motor tricycles in category A if they are over 21 years of age.

Note 12
This applies to all category B licence holders regardless of the test pass date.

MAM – means Maximum Authorised Mass.


Answer

Depending on the offence, penalty points and disqualifications are valid for either 3 or 10 years, but they remain on your record for an additional year. Please see the link in Related Information which tells you how long points will remain on your driving record.


If you apply for a driving licence at the age of 17, any points you received as a 15-year-old will be shown on your driving record - you can view your driving record via the link in Related Information.


If you acquire further points on your licence so that the number reaches 6 or more within 2 years of passing your test your licence will be revoked and if you obtain 12 points with a 3 year period, you will be disqualified.


Answer

If you acquire 6 or more penalty points within 2 years of passing your first driving test you will automatically have your licence revoked. To get it back you must apply and pay for a new provisional licence, drive as a learner (supervision, 'L' plates etc.) and pass both theory (including hazard perception) and practical tests again.

You can acquire penalty points on your provisional licence before you pass your test but if you then receive more points after passing your test, taking the total to 6 or more, your licence will be revoked. Having your licence revoked when you have acquired 6 or more penalty points does not 'wipe the slate clean', any live penalty points will still be shown on your licence when you get it back.

Revocation only applies where the offence that causes the points to number 6 or more is committed during the probationary period (2 years from passing your test). This means that if you obtain 6 points or more points before you have taken your test you can still pass your test and obtain your licence, but if you obtain any more points within 2 years of passing your test, your licence will be revoked.

Note: If the points on your licence number 12 or more within a three year period, you will be liable to be disqualified under the 'totting up' provisions – usually for at least 6 months.

Note: The penalty for using a mobile phone whilst driving is 6 penalty points and a £200 fine. For newly qualified drivers this could result in your licence being revoked for a single offence.


Answer

The link below allows you to view your driving licence online. You can use it to find out which vehicles you can drive, the penalty points on your licence and when your licence expires:

https://www.gov.uk/view-driving-licence


Answer

From the 08.06.15 the paper counterpart to photocard driving licences will no longer be valid and will no longer be issued by the DVLA. Note this does not affect photocard licences issued by the DVLA in Northern Ireland.

After 08.06.15, drivers who have a photocard driving licence should destroy their paper counterpart but must keep their photocard. Paper driving licences issued before photocards are still valid and should not be destroyed.

Courts and endorsements

From 08.06.15, penalty points will no longer be added to driving licences. Drivers who commit endorsable motoring offences after this date will still have to pay the relevant fine and submit their driving licence to the court but the court will keep the paper counterpart and return only the photocard to the driver. For paper licences the court will return the licence but won't write/print the offence details on it. Therefore, from 08.06.15 photocard and paper licences will not give accurate information about a driver's endorsements. However, this record will be kept by the DVLA and drivers can check what it says online or by post via the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/view-driving-licence

Hiring a car

After 08.06.15, drivers who hire vehicles or who need to provide evidence of their driver record to an employer etc., will be able to do this online for free by accessing the DVLA's Share Driving Licence service. This service is only available from 08.06.15 and should be used by all photocard and paper licence holders – it will allow them to download a summary of their driver record that can be printed or shared with others. Drivers who don't have access to the internet can call DVLA and give permission for their driving record to be checked verbally by a nominated person/organisation.

Businesses

Businesses that need to check customer's/employee's driving licence counterpart can do so via the Share Driving Licence service. This new service is designed for businesses that need real-time access to driving licence information. Information via Share Driving Licence will only be made available with the consent of the driving licence holder.


Answer

The licence you need to ride a Piaggio MP3 will depend on the power output and the spacing of the front wheels.

If the vehicle is classed as a motorcycle you'll need the appropriate category for its power output:

  • A1- Light motorcycle up to 11 kW (and a power-to-weight ratio of no more than 0.1 kW per kg) and 125 cc. The minimum age is 17.
  • A2- Standard motorcycle up to 35 kW (and a power-to-weight ratio of no more than 0.2 kW per kg) bike must not be derived from vehicle more than twice its power. The minimum age is 19.
  • A- Unrestricted motorcycles in power/size, with or without a sidecar. The minimum age is 21.

If the vehicle is classed as a tricycle, you can drive a motor tricycle of any power rating if you are over 21 and have a full car driving licence. If not, you will need a full category A1 motorbike licence to ride motor tricycles up to a power output 15 kW , and a full category A motorbike licence to ride trikes with a power output of more than 15 kW .


Answer

To drive a motorhome with a MAM of between 3.5 to 7.5 tonnes, you need a Category C1 licence. To drive a motorhome with a MAM over 7.5 tonnes, you need a category C licence.


Answer

To mark the UK’s exit from the EU, the EU flag has been removed from all UK driving licences, with the first batches issued from 1 January 2021. While existing licences will still be valid, the new versions will be issued to everyone renewing a licence or getting one for the first time.

UK Driving Licence

(Thanks to Gov.uk for the photo)

Please see the website in Related Information for more information.


Answer

This will all depend on what job you do. The courts are not required to notify your employer in every case but some professions e.g. doctors and solicitors, are subject to regulation and the courts will inform the relevant professional body e.g. the General Medical Council, if one of their members is convicted of an offence. However, your contract of employment may require you to notify your employer of a conviction but this will be a matter between you and your employer.


Answer

There is a substantial body of research showing that using a mobile phone whilst driving, even legally via hands-free, is a considerable distraction and greatly increases the risk of a driver being involved in an accident. This is because of the mental distraction and the driver having to divide their attention between using their phone/device and driving. Therefore, we would suggest that you don't use a mobile phone/device, even hands-free, whilst driving.
 
Standard of driving
It's important to realise that even if you aren't contravening the mobile phone/other hand-held device legislation explained below, if operating any device whether it's hand-held or not, affects your driving, you can still commit offences such as not being in proper control of your vehicle, careless or even dangerous driving. This also applies to operating any device in your vehicle e.g. car radio, sat-nav etc. Note that if you were involved in an accident and your telephone records showed that you were using your mobile at the time of the incident, even via voice activation, it could have serious legal implications.

Mobile phone/other hand-held devices – legal requirements
The law states that no person shall drive, or cause or permit to be driven, a motor vehicle on a road if the driver is using:
 
  • a hand-held mobile telephone, or
  • a hand-held device other than a two-way radio, which is capable of transmitting and receiving data, whether or not those capabilities are enabled.

Additionally, no person shall supervise a holder of a provisional licence if the person supervising is using a hand-held mobile telephone or a hand-held device as above at a time when the provisional licence holder is driving a motor vehicle on a road.
 
A mobile telephone or other device is to be treated as hand-held if it is, or must be, held at some point while being used.
 
Using includes the following –
 
  • Illuminating the screen
  • Checking the time
  • Checking notifications
  • Unlocking the device
  • Making, receiving, or rejecting a telephone or internet-based call
  • Sending, receiving or uploading oral or written content
  • Sending, receiving or uploading a photo or video
  • Utilising camera, video, or sound recording functionality
  • Drafting any text
  • Accessing any stored data such as documents, books, audio files, photos, videos, films, playlists, notes or messages
  • Accessing an application
  • Accessing the internet.

What does this mean?
The offence of using a hand-held mobile phone or similar device is triggered when a driver holds a mobile phone or similar device and uses it, regardless of whether that use involves interactive communication. This covers any device which is capable of interactive communication even if that functionality is not enabled at the time, for example, because mobile data is switched off, or the device is in flight mode.

Provided that a phone/device can be operated without holding it, then hands-free equipment is not prohibited by the above requirements.

Pushing buttons/touching a phone while it's in a cradle is not covered by the above offence, provided you don't hold the phone. Therefore, in our opinion, if the device can allow for hands-free calls, such as when using Apple's Siri voice command system or using a car's compatible systems, it would be legal but inadvisable to use whilst driving. However, we would emphasise that ultimately this would be a matter for a court to decide.

The use of a mobile phone or similar device for texting/internet access etc., while driving is also prohibited if the phone/device has to be held in order to operate it.

What is the penalty for using a mobile phone/device?
Using a mobile phone/device in breach of the above requirements carries 6 points and a £200 fine.
 
Can I use my phone as a sat nav?
The use of a phone as a sat nav is lawful providing you don't have to hold it at any time. Please see the section on 'Mobile phone/other hand-held devices – legal requirements' for information on touching the screen etc.

Mobile phone - use when parked
Whether someone is driving in terms of the law is a question of fact and degree and is ultimately a matter for a court to decide. If you are sitting in the driving seat of a vehicle on a road with the engine running you will usually be deemed to be driving for the purposes of this offence. There have even been cases where people have been found to be driving when they have let the vehicle roll forward without the engine running. In order to ensure you don't break the law in relation to using a phone/device when parked in a safe and lawful place, we would suggest the following:
 
  • Use a hands-free kit
  • Use the phone/device outside the vehicle
  • Ideally, don't use the phone/device at all

Mobile phone - positioning
The law does not state where your phone cradle must be positioned providing it doesn't obscure your view from the vehicle – if it does you could commit an offence.

Must my phone be in a cradle?
If at any point you have to hold your phone/device to use it whilst driving, you will commit an offence. Therefore, it is best to secure it in a suitable cradle.

What about queuing in traffic?
It's illegal to use a hand-held phone or similar device if you're stopped in queuing traffic e.g. at traffic lights, hold-ups etc. Whilst there may be situations when drivers are held for hours in a queue of traffic e.g. following a serious accident, the legislation doesn't specifically provide an exemption in such circumstances. Therefore, to ensure you don't commit an offence in relation to using a mobile phone in such a situation, we would suggest using a hands-free kit.

Are there any exemptions?
Yes, there are three exemptions to the above provisions if someone is using the mobile telephone or other device to:
 
  • Call the police, fire, ambulance or other emergency service on 112 or 999, in response to a genuine emergency, and it is unsafe or impracticable for them to cease driving in order to make the call (or if applicable for the provisional licence holder to cease driving while the call was being made).
  • Perform a remote controlled parking function of the motor vehicle, and that mobile telephone or other device only enables the motor vehicle to move where:
    • there is continuous activation of the remote control application of the telephone or device by the driver,
    • the signal between the motor vehicle and the telephone or the motor vehicle and the device, as appropriate, is maintained, and
    • the distance between the motor vehicle and the telephone or the motor vehicle and the device, as appropriate, is not more than 6 metres.
  • Make a contactless payment for goods/services which are received at the same time as, or after, the contactless payment is made and the motor vehicle is stationary.

Wearable technology
It is not yet clear whether using a smartwatch strapped to your wrist would constitute a hand-held device for the purposes of the mobile phone legislation – this matter would have to be decided by the courts. However, if operating such a device affects your driving, you can still commit offences such as not being in proper control of your vehicle, careless or even dangerous driving – see the section on 'Standard of driving' for further information. Additionally, the legislation on viewing a screen may also apply – see the sections on 'Viewing a screen'. and 'Mobile phone/other hand-held devices – legal requirements' for information in relation to the use of voice command systems.

Viewing a screen
Legislation states that no person shall drive or cause or permit to be driven a motor vehicle on a road if the driver is in such a position as to be able to see, directly or by reflection, a television screen or similar apparatus except one showing information:
 
  • about the state of the vehicle or its equipment e.g. screen warning lights;
  • about the location of the vehicle and the road on which it is located e.g. some GPS tracking devices;
  •  to assist the driver to see the road adjacent to the vehicle e.g. reversing cameras; or
  • to assist the driver to reach their destination e.g. sat navs.

In-ear earphones
There is no specific legislation that applies to using head/earphones whilst riding/driving. However, when driving it is best not to do anything that restricts your senses or concentration, as this may impede your awareness of or reaction to a situation. If this occurred, depending on the circumstances, you could be prosecuted for driving without due care and attention but this would ultimately be a matter for a court to decide.

Cyclists
The mobile phone legislation only applies to motor vehicles. However, if a cyclist was using a mobile phone, they could commit offences such as careless or dangerous cycling.

Two-way radios
The use of 2-way radio equipment (unless the device can also be used as a phone) when driving is not included in the mobile phone legislation but note that if a device is a dual or multi-purpose device that can be used both as a mobile phone and a 2-way radio, the use of the device while driving or supervising a provisional licence holder is prohibited. Use is prohibited whether the device is being used as a 2-way radio or as a mobile phone. However, whilst the law on mobile phones doesn't apply to a two-way radio, if operating such a radio affects your driving, you can still commit offences such as not being in proper control of your vehicle, careless or even dangerous driving – see the section on 'Standard of driving' for further information.

Using a mobile phone/smartwatch to scan
Please see the ‘Are there any exemptions’ section above.
 


Answer

From Monday 4th December 2017, four changes were made to driving tests conducted in England, Scotland and Wales. The changes are designed to ensure that new drivers have the skills they need in order to drive safely in modern day driving conditions. Initially, the changes described below will only apply to car driving tests.

Independent driving
The independent driving part of the test i.e. the part of the test where candidates have to drive without turn-by-turn directions from the examiner, will increase from around 10 minutes to 20 minutes.

Using a sat nav
During the independent driving part of the test most candidates will be asked to follow directions from a sat nav but one in five candidates will be asked to follow traffic signs instead.

The sat nav will be provided by the examiner (Tom Tom Start 52), who will set the route the candidate needs to follow – candidates cannot use their own sat nav .

Candidates will be allowed to ask the examiner for confirmation of where they're going and it won't matter if they go the wrong way so long as they don't commit a fault.

Reversing
Whilst the 'reversing around a corner' and 'turn in the road' manoeuvres will still be taught by driving instructors, they won't be included on the driving test. Instead, candidates will be asked to do one of four reversing manoeuvres:

  • Parallel park at the side of the road.
  • Parking in a parking bay – candidates will be asked to drive in and reverse out.
  • Parking in a parking bay – candidates will be asked to reverse in and drive out.
  • Pull up on the right-hand side of the road, reverse for two car lengths and then re-join the traffic.

Vehicle safety questions
Candidates will be asked to answer two vehicle safety questions by the examiner – these are known as 'show me, tell me' questions.

Candidates will be asked the 'tell me' question at the start of the test before they start driving. The question will be about how to carry out a safety task e.g. 'Tell me how you'd check the brake lights are working on this car'.

Candidates will be asked the 'show me' question whilst they are driving e.g. 'When it's safe to do so, can you show me how you'd set the rear demister '.

Your driving instructor will be able to tell you more about the questions that may be asked.

General matters
The cost and duration (approximately 40 minutes) of the driving test will remain the same. Additionally, there are no changes to the way the examiner will mark the test – candidates will still pass so long as they make no more than 15 driving faults and no serious or dangerous faults.


Answer

There are a number of different designs of L plate fixings available, as opposed to the traditional flat plastic plates that have been used for many years. Whilst the law doesn't specify how L plates must be attached to a vehicle, it does require that they must be displayed to the front and rear of a vehicle that's being driven by a learner and they must be the correct size – please see the link below:

Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency - L plates

L plates should be removed from a vehicle when it's not being used by a learner.

If you fail to display an L plate on your vehicle when you're learning to drive or if it's the wrong size, you can be fined and receive up to 6 penalty points on your driving licence.


Answer

The flowcharts below explain what you need to do to obtain the various categories of motorcycle licence.

If the images do not display, please click here.


Answer

No - if you drive/park a vehicle on the road that is not taxed or insured you will be committed two offences and your vehicle could be seized.

Contact your local police force

Enter your town or postcode to see information from your local force

If you can't find the answer?

Submit A Question