ATP Template with bundler

Abnormal loads


Answer

An LGV is a vehicle that weighs over 3,500 kg.

Drivers will need a different licence entitlement to drive different types of buses, coaches and lorries. Drivers must hold full (not provisional) category B entitlement (car) before they can take an LGV or PCV test . They must also gain a full category entitlement for a vehicle before taking a second test to add the trailer entitlement (+E). No additional entitlement is required to tow trailers that weigh less than 750 kg. If at any stage the driver loses their car licence entitlement, they will also automatically lose the LGV or PCV licence.

Every person intending to use a goods vehicle (above 3.5 tonnes) in connection with any trade or business carried out by him, or a Passenger Carrying Vehicle on a road, for hire or reward, must apply to the Traffic Commissioner for an operator licence. The role of Traffic Commissioners is to promote road safety and the safety of the travelling public.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA), on behalf of the Traffic Commissioners, maintain the Operator Licensing scheme. DVSA process all Operator Licence applications. The DVSA website includes comprehensive guidance on how to apply and manage licence details, which can now be changed electronically.

Further information can be obtained from either the DVLA or the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DSVA).


Answer

The Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1988 (C&U) provide the basic law by which normal motor vehicles and trailers are built and operate on the road.

The movement of large or heavy loads that exceed dimensions set down in the C&U Regulations is permitted provided they comply with the Road Vehicles (Authorisation of Special Types) (General) Order 2003 (STGO). These are generally referred to as Abnormal Loads.

An abnormal indivisible load is one which cannot, without undue expense or risk of damage, be divided into 2 or more loads for the purpose of carriage and, on account of its length, width, height or weight, cannot be carried on a normal vehicle.

The dimensions of an abnormal load are as follows:

Width

  • C & U Regs and STGO - Over 305 mm overhang on either side.
  • C & U Regs – Over 2.9 metres overall width.
  • STGO – Over 3metres overall width

Length

  • C & U Regs – Over 18.65 metres rigid length.
  • STGO – Over 18.75 metres rigid length
  • C & U and STGO – Over 25.9 metres overall length
  • C & U and STGO – Over 3.05 metres overhang (Load) to front or rear.

Weight

  • C & U and STGO – Exceeding authorised weight for that class of vehicle (Generally 44 tonnes).


Answer

Before an abnormal load can be transported on a road the operator has to comply with the conditions of the following legislation:

  • The Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986,
  • The Road Vehicles (Authorised Weights) Regulations 1998,
  • The Road Vehicles (Authorisation of Special Types) (General) Order 2003

The driver must notify the Police and in addition, if the gross weight or axle weights exceed those specified in the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986, he must notify the Highway Authority and all bridge owners along the proposed route.

If the load exceeds any of the following widths or lengths or 80 tonnes gross weight – two days notice is required by the police.

Width
C & U and STGO – Over 305 mm overhang on either side
C & U – Over 2.9 metres overall width
STGO – Over 3 metres overall length

Length
C & U – Over 18.65 metres rigid length
STGO – Over 18.75 metres rigid length
C & U and STGO – Over 25.9 metres overall length
C & U and STGO – Over 3.05 metres overhang to front or rear

If the abnormal load exceeds the maximum authorised weight for its class of vehicle (normally 44 tones) but does not exceed 80 tonnes gross weight, the movement requires two clear days' notice (with indemnity) to the Highways and Bridges Authorities.

If the load exceeds 80 tonnes, five clear days' notice (with indemnity) is required to the Highways and Bridges Authorities.

Generally, there are no restrictions on when an abnormal load can be moved. However most Police forces will restrict the hours when loads can be moved. Normally they will be prohibited during the hours of darkness and at peak-traffic periods.


Answer

You must notify each Chief Officer of Police and Highways and Bridges Authority, through which the load is intending to travel.

The details of the load, vehicle and intended route can be faxed, emailed or posted to the relevant authorities. A website has been developed by the Highways Agency for plotting and notification of all abnormal loads. A link to the ESDAL (Electronic Service Delivery for Abnormal Loads) website is provided on the right hand side of this page.

The Police no longer routinely escort abnormal loads. However, it is best to check with individual Police forces as to their requirements, as this may differ from force to force. This should be agreed at the time of notification.

With the exception of the very largest loads, haulers are permitted to provide their own escort vehicles. Generally, some form of escort will be required, (taking account of the width, speed and weight of the load), particularly on motorways and on dual carriageways.

Private escorts do not have any powers to control traffic. An escort is provided for the purpose of giving warning to the driver of that vehicle or combination, and to any other person, of any danger likely to be caused by the presence on the road of that vehicle, combination or load.

The escort and vehicle must comply with the NPCC / Highways Agency code of practice which can be found on the Highways Agency website, see related information.


Answer

Loads overhanging the front and rear of a vehicle

The table below is a summary of the requirements applicable to loads overhanging the front and rear of a vehicle.

Length of Projection

Action if load projects rearwards

Action if load projects forwards

Not exceeding 1 metre

 

No requirements specified

 

No requirements specified

 

More than 1 metre, but not exceeding 2 metres

 

End must be made clearly visible

 

No requirements specified

 

More than 2 metres, but not exceeding 3.05 metres.

 

Marker boards required

 

· Attendant required

· Marker boards required

Exceeding 3.05 metres

 

· Two clear working days notice to Police

 

· Attendant required

 

· Marker boards required

 

· Two clear working days notice to Police

 

· Attendant required

 

· Marker boards required

 

Racing boats propelled by oars and certain other vehicles have slightly different requirements.

Loads overhanging the side/s of a vehicle

The table below is a summary of the requirements applicable to loads carried by vehicles under the Construction and Use regulations. 

Load Projection or Overall Width Action required

Load Projection or Overall Width Action required

Over 305mm lateral projection on either side.

· Two clear working days notice to Police

· Marker boards front and rear

· Additional lights required during hours of darkness or poor visibility

More than 2.9 metres, but not exceeding to 3.5 metres overall width

· Two clear working days notice to Police

· Marker boards front and rear

· Additional lights required during hours of darkness or poor visibility.

More than 3.5 metres, but not exceeding to 4.3 metres overall width

· Two clear working days notice to Police

· Attendant required

· Marker boards front and rear

· Additional lights required during hours of darkness or poor visibility.

There are different requirements for the carrying of loads by vehicles such as vehicles for haulage, agriculture, lifting etc.  

If you would like further information in relation to overhanging loads please see the link below:

Department of Transport - Overhanging Loads: Guidance

Offences

Please be aware that even if you comply with the above requirements if the load is unsafe/insecure or if your vehicle is overweight, you could be prosecuted.

Contact your local police force

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