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Nuisance motor vehicles/bikes


Answer

It is important for the police to obtain as much information as possible with regards to the details of the car/bike and also the driver/rider and passengers. You do not have to disclose your details to the police when making a report.

It is best to contact the police as soon as the cars/bikes arrive so that the police have a better chance of apprehending those responsible. You can report nuisance motor vehicles to your local police force via their 101 non-emergency number.


Answer

You should contact your local Neighbourhood Policing Team, via 101, and provide them with as much detail as possible. For example, any details of a youth that are riding or if the youths are riding on a regular basis, if there are any particular times the youths are riding on the street.

Community Support Officers are a valuable source of information and the team may be aware of other incidents or the identity of the youths involved.

The police have a number of powers to deal with the use of such vehicles, these include the seizure of the vehicle under section 165A of the Road Traffic Act 1988 (Power to seize vehicles driven without a licence or insurance) or section 59 of the Police Reform Act 2002 (seizure of vehicles used in manner causing alarm, distress or annoyance).


Answer

You should contact your local police force via 101 and provide them with as much information as possible. For example, the names of any youths involved, a description or the registration numbers of the vehicles. The earlier you contact the police regarding the incident the more chance the police will have of catching the individuals.

The police have a number of powers to deal with the use of such vehicles these include the seizure of the vehicle under section 165A of the Road Traffic Act 1988 (Power to seize vehicles driven without licence or insurance) or section 59 of the Police Reform Act 2002 (seizure of vehicles used in manner causing alarm, distress or annoyance).

The cars used also often have no insurance, tax or MOT. If you are aware of where these cars are being left then contact the police so they can be towed away. You can report nuisance motor vehicles to your local police force via their 101 non-emergency number.


Answer

At present legislation only provides the local authority with the power to take action against loud car stereos if the car is on private land or parked on the street. If there is a car/a group of cars that is parked up constantly on your street and the stereos are being played very loud then you need to make a complaint to your local authority.

The police also have powers to deal with cars playing loud music (whilst driving and stationary) although the officers would have to be present and hear the noise before they could take any action.

If it is a one-off occurrence then neither the police nor the local authority will be likely to take any action. If however it is a persistent problem then either contact the local authority or your local police via their 101 number.

See the website in related information to find your local authority.


Answer

The police have a number of powers to deal with such problems, one of the powers is to seize a vehicle causing alarm, distress or annoyance. The car must be being used in such a way that it commits the offence of driving without due care or driving on footpath, moorland, bridleway etc and that the vehicle is being used anti-socially i.e. it is causing alarm, distress or annoyance. There are other requirements that the police have to carry out before a car can be seized.

It is also an offence to use, cause or permit a motor vehicle to cause excessive noise which could have been avoided by the driver exercising reasonable care. You can report nuisance motor vehicles to your local police force via their 101 non-emergency number or online reporting form. You can also submit dashcam footage to some police forces. Please see Q942 for information.

From a practical point of view, a police officer will usually need to be present to witness the behaviour. It is advisable to contact your local police station as soon as the vehicles start to cause a nuisance.

In many cases the drivers of the vehicles may be committing offences such a careless or dangerous driving. There may also be offences in relation to the use of the vehicle and its condition.


Answer

If a person drives a mechanically propelled vehicle on a road or other public place without due care and attention, or without reasonable consideration for other persons using the road or place, he is guilty of an offence. You can report this and any other nuisance motor vehicles directly to your local police force via their 101 number.

You commit the offence of careless driving if your driving falls below the standard of a competent and careful driver. Whether your driving falls below this standard is a matter for a court to decide. In order to commit the offence of inconsiderate driving it has to be shown that your driving has inconvenienced another person. Neither offence makes any allowance for your level of driving experience – a learner driver can be convicted of either offence.

You can commit the offences of careless or inconsiderate driving in/on any mechanically propelled vehicle i.e. any vehicle that's powered by an engine. This means that as well as cars, lorries and motorcycles, it also includes off-road motorcycles, pit-bikes, mini-motos, tractors, plant equipment, Segways (gyroscopic scooters), electric scooters and go-carts etc. The offence also applies to both roads and public places e.g. public car parks and pedestrian precincts etc.

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