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I've heard that it's lawful to use electric scooters (e-scooters) on the road, is this correct?


Answer

A trial has been set up regarding the use of e-scooters on roads and in cycle lanes. The trial has been designed to help understand whether the devices reduce motor traffic, as well as their impact on safety for users and others. They will be strictly prohibited on pavements, will be limited to 15.5mph and riders are recommended to wear helmets.

Users will need a full or provisional car, motorcycle or moped licence to take part in the trials, and must be 16 or over. E-scooters in the trials also need to be covered by a motor vehicle insurance policy - it is understood rental operators will ensure a policy is in place that covers users of the vehicles but we would suggest you check this before using the e-scooter.

To avoid a flood of poor-quality scooters onto the streets, the regulations only cover rental schemes. Individually owned scooters will still be illegal on public roads.

The trial, which is due to last for 12 months, will be closely monitored so the Government can assess the benefits of e-scooters and their impact on public space.

Further information can be found in the Government guidance under Related Information and via the link below:

GOV.UK - E-scooter trials: guidance for users

Related questions


Answer

It is important for the police to obtain as much information as possible with regards to the details of the car/bike and also the driver/rider and passengers. You do not have to disclose your details to the police when making a report.

It is best to contact the police as soon as the cars/bikes arrive so that the police have a better chance of apprehending those responsible. You can report nuisance motor vehicles to your local police force via their 101 non-emergency number.

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Answer

Electric scooters, quads, go-peds, mini-motos, hoverboards and Segways
In legal terms, these are all examples of vehicles that may be considered motor vehicles and are therefore subject to all the usual legal requirements that apply to other motor vehicles such as cars or motorcycles.

Therefore, they cannot be used on the road unless they are taxed (if required), registered, have an MOT (if required), are insured and the driver has a valid driving licence for the category of vehicle. If any of these requirements are not met, the vehicle can't legally be driven/ridden on the road.

In reality, many of these types of vehicle will never be 'road legal' because their design fails to meet road-vehicle safety standards.

Note also that it's an offence to use such vehicles on the pavement too.

They cannot be used on council land e.g. parks, unless there is a designated area specifically for them. In some areas, there may be commercially operated parks where they can be used.

They can only legally be used on private land/property with the permission of the land/property owner. However, note that it's against the law for a child under 13 to drive/ride on a tractor or self-propelled vehicle e.g. a quad, when it's being used in agricultural operations.

Electric bikes
Electric bikes known as Electrically Assisted Pedal Cycles (EAPCs) can be used on the road as long as they meet certain requirements (see Q605) and the rider is at least 14 years old.

EAPCs aren't classed as motor vehicles and so don't require insurance and the driver doesn't need a driving licence. Additionally, they are exempt from having to be registered and vehicle tax.

EAPCs cannot be used on the pavement.

Electric scooter trials
In some parts of the country, you can legally rent an electric scooter as part of a government trial – this is explained in Q1062.


Answer

You should contact your local Neighbourhood Policing Team, via 101, and provide them with as much detail as possible. For example, any details of a youth that are riding or if the youths are riding on a regular basis, if there are any particular times the youths are riding on the street.

Community Support Officers are a valuable source of information and the team may be aware of other incidents or the identity of the youths involved.

The police have a number of powers to deal with the use of such vehicles, these include the seizure of the vehicle under section 165A of the Road Traffic Act 1988 (Power to seize vehicles driven without a licence or insurance) or section 59 of the Police Reform Act 2002 (seizure of vehicles used in manner causing alarm, distress or annoyance).


Answer

You should contact your local police force via 101 and provide them with as much information as possible. For example, the names of any youths involved, a description or the registration numbers of the vehicles. The earlier you contact the police regarding the incident the more chance the police will have of catching the individuals.

The police have a number of powers to deal with the use of such vehicles these include the seizure of the vehicle under section 165A of the Road Traffic Act 1988 (Power to seize vehicles driven without licence or insurance) or section 59 of the Police Reform Act 2002 (seizure of vehicles used in manner causing alarm, distress or annoyance).

The cars used also often have no insurance, tax or MOT. If you are aware of where these cars are being left then contact the police so they can be towed away. You can report nuisance motor vehicles to your local police force via their 101 non-emergency number.


Answer

If the land is council owned then it is unlikely that they will have given permission for the youths to ride their quad bikes on it. If the youths are appearing on a regular basis on the field then contact your local Neighbourhood Policing Team via 101. Community Support Officers are a valuable source of information and the team may be aware of other incidents or the identity of the youths involved.

The police have a number of powers to deal with the use of such vehicles, these include the seizure of the vehicle under section 165A of the Road Traffic Act 1988 (Power to seize vehicles driven without a licence or insurance) or section 59 of the Police Reform Act 2002 (seizure of vehicles used in manner causing alarm, distress or annoyance).

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