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    Q381: Receiving parking tickets/fines for a vehicle you've sold, never owned or which you do own but you know it wasn't your vehicle

    If you used to own the vehicle but don't anymore

    If you have a letter from the DVLA confirming that you are no longer the registered keeper of the vehicle, send a copy to the organisation that sent you the fine. It's a good idea to keep a copy of any documentation that you send.

     

    If you don't have a letter from the DVLA confirming that you are no longer the registered keeper of the vehicle, write to them at the address below and ask for such proof.


    DVLA
    Swansea
    SA99 1ZZ

     

    When you have obtained conformation from the DVLA that you're no longer the register keeper, you can send it to the organisation that sent you the fine.

    Please note that if you have not informed the DVLA that you have sold the car (see Q916) then you will continue to receive any documentation to do with the car until you do notify them that you are no longer the keeper and provide them with details of who you sold it to.

     

    The law provides that where there is a change of registered keeper the existing registered keeper must notify the DVLA – if they fail to do this they could be fined up to £1000.

     

    You can now tell the DVLA you've sold, transferred or bought a vehicle online via the link below:

     

    https://www.gov.uk/sold-bought-vehicle

     

    If you have never owned the vehicle
    Write to the DVLA at the address above and ask them for proof that you're not the registered keeper of the vehicle – provide them with as much information about the vehicle as you can. The DVLA will then update their records and send you a letter to confirm this with 4 weeks. You can then send it to the organisation that sent you the fine.

    If you suspect your vehicle's number plates may have been cloned because you've received a parking ticket/fine but know it wasn't your vehicle

    Cloning involves the copying of the identity of a similar (non-stolen) vehicle already on the road. Criminals find an exact match of the car they have stolen and copy the identity of the legitimate vehicle. This makes the vehicle they have stolen look legal based on false number plates being fitted. Unfortunately, it is up to you as the registered keeper to satisfy the issuer of the ticket that it was not you or your vehicle at the time and place where the alleged offence occurred.

     

    If you suspect your vehicle registration has been cloned, we would suggest you:

    • Report the matter to your local police via the non-emergency 101 number, the contact us page on their website (see link below) or by going to the police station.

    https://www.askthe.police.uk/content/Q727.htm

    • Contact the organisation that sent you the ticket/documentation and explain the circumstances to them.
    • Complete any relevant documentation you have been sent and return it to the organisation that issued it, providing them with any evidence that you have to prove your case – see additional suggestions below.
    • Write to the DVLA at the above address and explain the circumstances to them – include the crime reference number if the police gave you one. They will keep a record of the matter for future reference.

    Additional suggestions:

    • You could consider taking a photograph of the rear of your vehicle that may show that it was not your car. There will be differences between your car and the cloned one.
    • Legally manufactured number plates must have the details of the manufacturer on them so that may also be a way of distinguishing the vehicles, providing the photograph is of a high enough quality.
    • Can you prove your vehicle wasn't in the location at the time of the offence e.g. if you park your car in a car park whilst at work the operator may have CCTV evidence to prove that your car was there at the time of the alleged offence.

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